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Hey,

 

I am trying to finish my first quilt.  I just need to cut and attach the binding.  I have watched and read various videos and "how to" web sites.  Others have told me I need to cut the binding on the bias and I have read about that also.  What is your experiance.  Is it that imortant to cut the binding on the bias first of all, and if you do think that it is, what is your method?  There seems to be various ways to do it and all of them look a little complicated. If someone knew for certain that a particular method worked it would be helpful. A web link would be nice.

 

Dan

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I don't think your binding needs to be done on the bias, but if you are looking to do it on the bias then try Heather Mulder of Anka's Treasures

http://ankastreasures.wordpress.com/2008/09/04/quick-and-easy-bias-...

It's quick and easy.

Charlie
Thanks Charlie - looks like a good web site.
I agree with Charlie. I would do a bias binding if my quilt had scallop, wonky or rounded edges.
I agree with these guys. I'd only use bias binding for curved borders. Great link Charlie.
Hi Dan. Congratulations on trying to finish your first quilt. I just took a binding class this week and our instructor informed us that it can matter if your binding is cut on the bias, but there are usually only 2 reasons for this. First is that your borders are scalloped or otherwise rounded and you need a flexible binding to attach to those curves. The other reason is that you believe a particular judge in a particular show likes to see bias bindings on the quilts. If you are not going to place this quilt in a show then a binding cut on the straight grain is good. There are as many ways to do a binding as there are people but here are some links to help you along. Again, congrats! Debi R.
www.quiltcetera.com
-- click on Videos and look for "Free Beginner Quilting. Learn to Quilt. Mitered bindings"
www.thequiltshow.com
http://quilting.about.com/od/bindingaquilt/Binding_the_Quilt.htm
Thanks Debi,

I finished my quilt - made my own bias binding - learned fron watching a utube video - the binding turned out ok except my conrners are a bit sketchy - but anyway the first one is done and now working on machine quilting a string quilt. Nothing fancy just following the lines - stitch in the ditch method. Thanks for the feedback.

Dan
Dan: go to www.quilterstv.com and search for the program I did on bindings. I know your original post was back in January but just now signing on here. No it isn't necessary to cut binding on the bias. This is an "old wive's" tale. However, if you are doing a curved binding then you must do binding. I cut it across the fabric. This gives it a bit of give.
The important part is to be consistent in your seam allowance and stop at the corner about 2 stitches from that width. When I am getting to the corner I fold the binding back on itself and fold in a 45 degree fold. This gives me a mark that is exactly the same distance when I reach the fold as the width of the seam. Stop about 2 stitches from that point. The same principle applies here as the "scant quarter inch" for piecing. You need to leave a little space for the double fold of the binding.
I demonstrated this recently on QuiltersTV. I don't know how to navigate that site to find it but perhaps you can.
bindings should be consistent in seam with, carefully mitred corners and filled with the quilt. I discovered that I was loosing control the last 1/2" and my seam allowance was not consistent. This made rabbit eared corners.
Everyone should go and watch Holice's binding video. He's a great teacher and I learned lots from watching it! Thanks for the input Holice.

Holice Turnbow said:
Dan: go to www.quilterstv.com and search for the program I did on bindings. I know your original post was back in January but just now signing on here. No it isn't necessary to cut binding on the bias. This is an "old wive's" tale. However, if you are doing a curved binding then you must do binding. I cut it across the fabric. This gives it a bit of give.
The important part is to be consistent in your seam allowance and stop at the corner about 2 stitches from that width. When I am getting to the corner I fold the binding back on itself and fold in a 45 degree fold. This gives me a mark that is exactly the same distance when I reach the fold as the width of the seam. Stop about 2 stitches from that point. The same principle applies here as the "scant quarter inch" for piecing. You need to leave a little space for the double fold of the binding.
I demonstrated this recently on QuiltersTV. I don't know how to navigate that site to find it but perhaps you can.
bindings should be consistent in seam with, carefully mitred corners and filled with the quilt. I discovered that I was loosing control the last 1/2" and my seam allowance was not consistent. This made rabbit eared corners.
Couple more thoughts on bias binding. The posts are correct about bias on curves. Another which I read is for strength.
When you use across or straight binding then there are long threads along the edge that wear. In bias, since the threads are cross it has more durability. Now this can be a personal decision.
Now about judges. While some judges like bias, not all of us believe this is the rule. In fact there is no rule. Except, if you use a directional cut fabric for yur binding - stripes and printed stripes, the fabric should be cut with the pattern and not exact. This is so the print will be consistent along the edge of the quilt. However, if you use a stripe printed fabric or plaid, then it is better to cut on bias otherwise the binding will look like a candy cain. As a quilt judge, this is what I look for - the consistency of the pattern in the fabric. Remember - accurate seam allowance right down to the corner, binding full of quilt and batting and precisely mitred corners. If your corners are not coming out exact, the go back and rip out, if already sewed and see where the seam allowance stitch went right or left. Or better yet, check this before doing the hand work on the corner and restitch if necessary to make the seam consistent. It will be a better corner.
Judges also prefer to have the diagonal fold stitched closed on both back and front. In your personal quilts, this again is a matter of choice. Consider the binding like a picture frame...
WOW thanks alot Guys, --you certainly helped me out - what a lot of expert knowledge available to us. Thanks alot - I's sure that ohters must have found this discussion informative.

Dan

Holice Turnbow said:
Couple more thoughts on bias binding. The posts are correct about bias on curves. Another which I read is for strength.
When you use across or straight binding then there are long threads along the edge that wear. In bias, since the threads are cross it has more durability. Now this can be a personal decision.
Now about judges. While some judges like bias, not all of us believe this is the rule. In fact there is no rule. Except, if you use a directional cut fabric for yur binding - stripes and printed stripes, the fabric should be cut with the pattern and not exact. This is so the print will be consistent along the edge of the quilt. However, if you use a stripe printed fabric or plaid, then it is better to cut on bias otherwise the binding will look like a candy cain. As a quilt judge, this is what I look for - the consistency of the pattern in the fabric. Remember - accurate seam allowance right down to the corner, binding full of quilt and batting and precisely mitred corners. If your corners are not coming out exact, the go back and rip out, if already sewed and see where the seam allowance stitch went right or left. Or better yet, check this before doing the hand work on the corner and restitch if necessary to make the seam consistent. It will be a better corner.
Judges also prefer to have the diagonal fold stitched closed on both back and front. In your personal quilts, this again is a matter of choice. Consider the binding like a picture frame...
Dan:  I know this is too late for your quilt (Jan 2010 post) but check out the video I did for QuiltersTV.  It is at www.quilterstv.com and under Quilters Cafe.  It is still showing.  Have had many good comments on it.

Sharon Schamber has some great videos. I have the one on binding and she is one heck of a great teacher and artist!

Here is the link where you can buy her DVD's. The woman is SERIOUS about her work and teaching!

http://www.sharonschamber.com/shopping%20cart/Store.htm

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